Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Tao of Love And Sex: Female Sexual Tao

A SEXUAL problem rarely occurs in isolation. It takes form within a specific energy totality, a sort of syndrome or symptom complex. Traditional Chinese medicine recognizes a number of these sexually related syndromes, some of which are described below. Fortunately, a single individual rarely manifests all the symptoms of a given symptom complex. Nonetheless, the presence of a few of these symptoms makes it possible to identify a syndrome, determine its pathological tendencies, and thus avert them.

FEMALE SEXUAL FATIGUES

Deficiency of kidney yin
Signs: Protracted illness, insomnia, night sweats, dry mouth, dry throat, aching in the heels and lumbar region. Sexual manifestation: Profuse and incessant anovulatory uterine bleeding.
Deficiency of kidney yemg
Signs: Aversion to cold, pallor.
Sexual manifestation: Clear vaginal discharge, infertility due to cold in the uterus.

Deficiency of kidney yin and yang
Signs: Dizziness; ringing in the ears (tinnitus); aching and weakness in the lumbar region and knee joints; profuse, dilute urine.
Sexual manifestation: Vaginal discharge, infertility.

Deficiency of jin and kidney qi
Signs: Old age or lao-sun (fatigue with exhaustion); frequent micturation with pale, dilute urine, becoming more pronounced at night with each urination; sometimes accompanied by urinary incontinence. Sexual manifestation: Clear, watery vaginal discharge.

Depletion of kidney jing
Signs: Weak constitution, overtiredness, chronic illness, dizziness, and ringing in the ears. Sexual manifestation: Infertility.

Deficiency of spleen and kidney yang
Signs: Cold limbs, pallor, weight loss, mental fatigue, cold and pain in the abdomen, diarrhea with pale stools, diarrhea in the early morning, cold and aching in the lower back and knee joints, frequent micturation with dribbling and urgency, frequent nighttime urination or dysuria (difficulties in urinating).
Sexual manifestation: Infertility due to cold in the uterus, clear vaginal discharge.

Deficiency of lung and kidney yin
Signs: Unproductive cough, dry mouth, dry throat, hoarseness, aching and weakness in the lumbar region and knee joints, nervous agitation, disturbed sleep patterns, a feeling of heat emanating from the bones, intermittent fever, night sweats, flushed cheeks.
Sexual manifestation: Exacerbated and unrestrained sexual activity.

FRIGIDITY AND THE BODY'S ENERGIES
The energy imbalances discussed above can all provoke sexual difficulties, especially frigidity. When the woman's sexual functions are normal and she has an acceptable sexual partner, her vagina should lubricate sufficiently, and she should be able to have orgasm occasionally and feel pleasure during sexual intercourse.

A recurrent and persistent absence of lubrication, vaginal dilation, and orgasm is the sign of sexual troubles or frigidity. Taoists think that the problems a woman can have in producing sufficient lubrication or attaining orgasm are not psychological in origin but result from a uterus that is, in a real and concrete way, too cold. The term for female frigidity in traditional Chinese medicine is "cold womb," and the only way to put an end to it is to "warm the uterus" by attending to the underlying energies.

Treatments of female sexual deficiencies often involve a comparison between human sexuality and the interaction of fire and water. When a woman's vagina lacks lubrication prior to the sex act, it means that she is suffering from a deficiency of kidney yin; the absence of vaginal dilation is due to a deficiency of kidney yang. Under these conditions, the uterus retracts because its temperature is too low and the fluids are obstructed. These phenomena, originating in an energy imbalance, can lead to indifference toward or even fear of or disgust for sexual relations on the part of the woman.

The deficiencies of the body always have some sexual manifestation. Here are some examples:

Deficiency of the kidneys: Joint pains; weakness in the legs; profuse urine; scanty menstrual flow; lack of sexual desire; infertility; slow, deep pulse; thin, light coating on the tongue.

Deficiency of blood: Pale or dull complexion; dry skin; weakness; abnormal menstruation; infertility; weak, thready pulse; whitish tongue.

Deficiency of yang: Cold in the lower abdomen and the lumbar region; lower abdominal pains; abnormal menstruation; deep, slow pulse.

Deficiency of kidney yin and liver congestion: Inexplicable crying, irritability, hysteria, mood swings, yawning, irregular appetite, dry stools.

All of these troubles are of course accompanied by a lack of desire for sex, or frigidity.

PLANTS AND FEMALE SEXUALITY
Here are a few plants known for their stimulating effect on female sexuality:

CHINESE ANGELICA: A TRUE FEMALE TONIC
Chinese angelica (Danggui) is regarded as the female equivalent of ginseng. The root of this plant contains sub stances that are similar in composition to female hormones. It is widely used in China in the months following childbirth to restore the vital forces and balance the blood. Chinese angelica is not recommended for use during pregnancy, however, because it tones the uterus. It is very useful for symptoms of menopause, including hot flashes, depression, aggressiveness, headaches, and joint pains. Some Chinese herbalists recommend the use of Chinese angelica for two-week health cures twice a year, preferably in spring and autumn.

If we open the Chinese encyclopedia of medicinal plants, we will find under the rubric of Chinese angelica the following explanations:
Botanical reference: Chinese angelica. Chinese name: Danggui. Pan used: Dried root.
Recommended dose: Four to eight grams a day. ! Energy: Warm. ' Taste: Sweet and pungent.
Actions: Tones the blood, activates the circulation of blood, regulates menstruation, relieves rheumatic pains. Indications: Female sexual fatigue, frigidity, anemia, irregular or painful menstruation, vaginal bleeding, postpartum abdominal pains, constipation due to deficiency of blood, infertility.
Home use of Chinese angelica: In certain Chinese grocery stores, you can find it in a manufactured preparation under the name Dang Gui Gin, an angelica-based liquid tonic of high quality.
Administration: Regardless of format (liquid, root, syrup, pills), Chinese angelica should be taken about thirty minutes before each of the three main meals with a little water that has been boiled and then allowed to cool until tepid. This will aid the absorption of the angelica by the intestine.
Here is a traditional Taoist method for the Chinese angelica cure. This cure, to be taken in spring or autumn, should last two weeks.

  • Every day for two weeks drink two glasses of Chinese angelica decoction.
  • For two glasses of the decoction, cook slowly, using a double boiler, six grams of cut-up Chinese angelica root in five to six cups of water for three hours.
  • Cook in a clay or earthenware pot.

This cure will fortify your ovaries and Fallopian tubes. Chinese angelica can help your body to maintain its production of estrogen well into old age and thus can delay the onset of menopause and retard the aging process. Many therapists recommend this cure as a preventive measure for women in good health. The prevention of disease has always been a top priority for natural medicine.

ALOE: GREEN GOLD
Botanical reference: Aloe vera. Energy: Cool. Taste: Bitter.
Actions: Relieves constipation, unblocks the liver and the bile ducts, regulates menstruation, rejuvenates the body, fortifies and beautifies the female sexual organs. Properties: Laxative, vulnerary, emollient, emmenagogic.

Energy profile: Apparently of Persian origin, aloe is highly esteemed by Chinese therapists. Medical treatises from China and India consider it the herb of choice for treating constipation and scanty, irregular, and painful menstruation.
Utilization: Used alone, aloe can trigger diarrhea, which is why Indian therapists mix it with a little ginger. This mixture has the further advantage of reducing the nausea that some people experience when swallowing aloe. The aloe plant is well adapted to temperate climates and can be grown in a backyard garden without too much trouble. It is used as part of the regenerative cures (Rasayana) of the yogi doctors of south India, who believe that constipation is the mother of all illnesses and aging; their rejuvenating cures are designed to rid the body of toxins and prevent their further accumulation. "The aloe cure," certain Taoists claim, "preserves youth and vigor and thus promotes longevity." Taoist physicians also use aloe to fortify the brain, decongest the liver, and encourage the growth of hair. According to scientists, the abundant presence of vitamin A in aloe accounts for some of its revitalizing properties, which have been widely recognized since antiquity. Administration: According to the Taoist tradition, the usual daily dose consists of four grams of powdered aloe leaves (available from herbalist pharmacies) mixed together with two grams of powdered ginger root and a teaspoon of good-quality honey. Take half of this mixture on awaking and the rest at night, before bedtime. Continue this cure for one week while eliminating mutton, fish, and sesame oil from your diet. Ideally, one should eat a vegetarian diet for the entire week, with lots of white rice (brown rice would be too irritating to the intestines). If you find the taste of aloe disagreeable, you can take two gel capsules three times a day before meals.

RASPBERRY LEAVES
Botanical reference: Rubus idaeus. Energy: Cold. Taste: Astringent.
Actions: Harmonizes pregnancy; relieves menstrual pain, stomach troubles, and symptoms of menopause. Properties: Diuretic, depurative, astringent, emmenagogic, antiscorbutic.
Energy profile: Chinese physicians, who have long recognized these properties in the raspberry, consider it a veritable panacea for female disorders, such as painful menstruation, vaginal discharges, and symptoms of menopause. Curiously enough, obstetricians during World War II discovered that fragarine, the active agent in raspberry leaves, is a relaxant for the muscles of the uterus. Administration: The best way to use raspberry leaves (available from herbalist pharmacies) is in a concentrated infusion, which can be prepared in the following manner: Take fifty grams of the plant and cover with a liter of boiling water. Cover the vessel (preferably a clay pot) and let infuse ten minutes. Strain. Drink three cups of this infusion every day for several weeks. Raspberry-leaf extract can also be used, two tablespoons diluted in a little warm water, three times a day. However, the alcohol in the extract can have a negative effect on sensitive livers, and this treatment should not be used for an extended period of time. A decoction of raspberry leaves with a little witch hazel makes a good vaginal douche, useful in treating leukorrhea. This cure should be halted as soon as the discharges cease.

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